The relationship between exposure to hot/cold weather and the clinical features of headaches in patients with migraine and tension-type headaches


TANIK N. , SAÇMACI H. , Akturk T.

NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH, vol.42, no.3, pp.239-243, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 42 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/01616412.2020.1723300
  • Title of Journal : NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH
  • Page Numbers: pp.239-243

Abstract

Background and purpose: This study investigates the relationship between exposure to hot/cold weather and the characteristic clinical features of headaches in patients with migraine and tension-type headaches. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with the participation of 190 patients with migraine, and 140 patients with tension-type headaches. The patients were evaluated using a form that collected data on their sociodemographic profile, the clinical features of their headaches, any accompanying symptoms and their relationships with changes in the weather (hot/cold). The headaches of all the participants in the study were thought to be triggered by exposure to hot/cold weather. Results: In the patients with migraine, the exposure to hot/cold weather as a trigger was not found to have a significant relationship with age, body mass index or the characteristic clinical features of headaches (p > 0.05). In patients with tension-type headaches, exposure to hot/cold weather as a trigger was found to have a significant relationship with body mass index (p = 0.019), but not with age or the characteristic clinical features of headaches (p > 0.05). Conclusions: In obese patients with tension-type headache, it was found that hot weather triggered headache more than cold weather. In patients with migraine and tension-type headaches, no relationship was found between exposure to hot/cold weather as a trigger and the clinical features of headaches. The accurate identification of the factors precipitating headaches by both clinicians and patients can help lower the frequency of headaches.