Treatment of Chylothorax with Pleurodesis (A Lesser Known Complication of Behçet's Disease): A Case Report.


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Demirdaş E., Atılgan K., Er Z. C., Akın S. E.

JOURNAL OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY HEART CENTER, vol.13, no.4, pp.180-182, 2018 (Scopus)

  • Publication Type: Article / Case Report
  • Volume: 13 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY HEART CENTER
  • Journal Indexes: Scopus, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, CINAHL, EBSCO Education Source, EMBASE, Directory of Open Access Journals
  • Page Numbers: pp.180-182
  • Yozgat Bozok University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Behçet's Disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis which usually affects optical, genital, and oral mucosae and often reoccurs intermittently. Chylothorax is a very rare complication of BD which usually causes thrombosis in the major venous system. A 27-year-old man with a 10-year history of BD referred to our cardiovascular surgery department with symptoms of serious aches in the left arm, edema, and apparent veins on the left anterior chest wall. A total thrombosis of the left internal and external jugular veins and the left subclavian vein was observed. One month after a successful treatment and discharge, the patient returned to our clinic with symptoms of dyspnea and coughs. A chest radiograph showed a consolidated region. A milky liquid was aspirated through thoracocentesis from the left thorax, and its biochemical analysis helped us arrive at a diagnosis of chylothorax. The patient was hospitalized and administered corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy with a high-carbohydrate and low-fat dietary regimen for BD. Thereafter, a left thoracic drainage system was established. On the seventh day of hospitalization, due to a progressing cheilosis flow, a pleurodesis process was applied with talcum powder. However, the chylous drainage was continued and 60 mL of venous autologous blood was injected into the left thorax through a drainage tube. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from the hospital uneventfully. At 1 month’s follow-up, the chest radiograph was normal.